Lecture Series in 2017-2018

Unless otherwise noted all lectures will be in Psychology 1312 on Thursdays at 4:00 p.m.

 

Sep 28, 2017
SAGE Center Lecture by Colin Camerer

Colin Camerer is the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics, T&C Chen Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience Leadership Chair, Executive Officer for the Social Sciences, and Director, T&C Chen Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience at Caltech. Dr. Camerer, a pioneer in behavioral economics and in neuroeconomics, is interested in how psychological forces and their deeper neuroscientific foundations influence economic decisions involving individuals and markets. In his research, he uses experiments to better understand how individuals and markets function, neuroscience to gain insight into the neuroscientific drivers for decision making and behavior, and game theory. Dr. Camerer was on the faculty of the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago from 1991 to 1994, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania from 1983 to 1991, and the Kellogg Graduate School of Business at Northwestern University from 1981 to 1983. He was a visiting fellow at Stanford University from 1997 to 1998, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation between 1991 and 1992, and a visiting professor of business at Caltech in 1987. Dr. Camerer is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the Econometric Society, and a fellow of the Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory. He was president of the Society for Neuroeconomics (2005–2006) and president of the Economic Science Association (2001–2003). Since 2007, he has been a chair of the Russell Sage Foundation Behavioral Economics Roundtable. He has one patent accepted on "Active Learning Decision Engines." He is on editorial boards for numerous journals. In 2013, he was named a MacArthur Fellow.

 

Oct 19, 2017
SAGE Center Lecture by Nicholas Carr

Nicholas Carr writes about technology and culture. His new book, Utopia Is Creepy, collects his best essays, blog posts, and other writings from the past dozen years, providing an alternative history of our tech-besotted time. In 2014, Carr published the acclaimed book The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, which examines the personal and social consequences of our ever growing dependency on computers, robots, and apps. His previous work, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize finalist and a New York Times bestseller. Carr is also the author of two other influential books, The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google (2008), and Does IT Matter? (2004). His books have been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

Carr has written for The Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Wired, Nature, MIT Technology Review, and many other periodicals. His essays, including “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” and “The Great Forgetting,” have been collected in several influential anthologies. In 2015, he received the Neil Postman Award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity from the Media Ecology Association.

Carr is a former member of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s editorial board of advisors, was on the steering board of the World Economic Forum’s cloud computing project, and was a writer-in-residence at the University of California, Berkeley’s journalism school. Since 2005, he has written the popular blog Rough Type. Earlier in his career, he was executive editor of the Harvard Business Review. He holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and an M.A., in English and American Literature and Language, from Harvard University.

 

Nov 16, 2017
SAGE Center Lecture by John Ioannidis

John Ioannidis is the C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention, Professor of Medicine, Professor of Health Research and Policy, Professor (by courtesy) of Biomedical Data Science at the School of Medicine; Professor of Statistics (by courtesy) at the School of Humanities and Sciences, co-Director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center, and Director of the PhD program in Epidemiology and Clinical Research at Stanford University. Dr. Ioannidis received his MD and DSc in biopathology from the National University of Athens. He trained at Harvard and Tufts (internal medicine and infectious diseases), then held positions at NIH, Johns Hopkins and Tufts. He has held academic appointments at University of Ioannina Medical School, Tufts University, Harvard School of Public Health and Imperial College.

Dr. Ioannidis has served as a member of the executive board of the Human Genome Epidemiology Network and Senior Advisor on Knowledge Integration at NCI/NIH (2012-6), President, Society for Research Synthesis Methodology, and editorial board member of many leading journals including Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has delivered over 400 invited and honorary lectures and is the recipient of many awards (e.g. European Award for Excellence in Clinical Science [2007], Medal for Distinguished Service, Teachers College, Columbia University [2015], Chanchlani Award for Global Health [2017]).

Dr. Ioannidis's empirical work includes meta-research and large-scale evidence (in particular randomized trials and meta-analyses) and appraisal and control of diverse biases in biomedical research. He is interested in developing and applying new research methods, and in the interdisciplinary enhancement of existing research methods for study design and analysis in biomedicine. Some of his most influential papers are those that address issues of replication validity of genetic association studies, biases in biomedical research, research synthesis methods, extensions of meta-analysis, genome-wide association studies and agnostic evaluation of associations, and validity of randomized trials and observational research. The PLoS Medicine paper on “Why most published research findings are false” has been the most-accessed article in the history of Public Library of Science (~2 million hits). In 2010,The Atlantic listed Dr. Ioannidis among its Brave Thinkers and wrote that he “may be one of the most influential scientists alive."

Dec 07, 2017
SAGE Center Lecture by Helen Fisher

Helen Fisher, a biological anthropologist, is a Senior Research Fellow at The Kisney Institute, Indiana University and Visiting Research Professor and member of the Center for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University. She is currently working on a book to be published by Henry Holt on mate choice. The book stems from her current work as Chief Scientific Advisor to the Internet site, Chemistry.com, where she has collecting data on some 500,000 individuals. In her book Why We Love: The Nature and Chemistry of Romantic Love (Henry Holt 2004; paperback 2005) Dr. Fisher discussed her research project with colleagues in which she used fMRI brain scanning to investigate the brain circuitry of romantic love. Dr. Fisher has been on the national and international lecture circuit since l983 discussing the evolution of human sexuality, romantic love, marriage and divorce, gender differences, and the future of men and women in business and family life. Since l983, Dr. Fisher has served as an anthropological commentator and/or consultant for businesses and the media. Her contracts include those with NBC's Today Show, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and the BBC. For her work in communicating anthropology to the lay public, Helen received the American Anthropological Association's "Distinguished Service Award." 

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