Lecture Series in 2017-2018

Unless otherwise noted all lectures will be in Psychology 1312 on Thursdays at 4:00 p.m.

 

Sep 28, 2017
How Neuroscience Can Inform Economics

Colin Camerer is the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics, T&C Chen Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience Leadership Chair, Executive Officer for the Social Sciences, and Director, T&C Chen Center for Social and Decision Neuroscience at Caltech. Dr. Camerer, a pioneer in behavioral economics and in neuroeconomics, is interested in how psychological forces and their deeper neuroscientific foundations influence economic decisions involving individuals and markets. In his research, he uses experiments to better understand how individuals and markets function, neuroscience to gain insight into the neuroscientific drivers for decision making and behavior, and game theory. Dr. Camerer was on the faculty of the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago from 1991 to 1994, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania from 1983 to 1991, and the Kellogg Graduate School of Business at Northwestern University from 1981 to 1983. He was a visiting fellow at Stanford University from 1997 to 1998, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation between 1991 and 1992, and a visiting professor of business at Caltech in 1987. Dr. Camerer is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the Econometric Society, and a fellow of the Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory. He was president of the Society for Neuroeconomics (2005–2006) and president of the Economic Science Association (2001–2003). Since 2007, he has been a chair of the Russell Sage Foundation Behavioral Economics Roundtable. He has one patent accepted on "Active Learning Decision Engines." He is on editorial boards for numerous journals. In 2013, he was named a MacArthur Fellow.

 

Nov 16, 2017
Towards More Reproducible and Unbiased Research

John Ioannidis is the C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention, Professor of Medicine, Professor of Health Research and Policy, Professor (by courtesy) of Biomedical Data Science at the School of Medicine; Professor of Statistics (by courtesy) at the School of Humanities and Sciences, co-Director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center, and Director of the PhD program in Epidemiology and Clinical Research at Stanford University. Dr. Ioannidis received his MD and DSc in biopathology from the National University of Athens. He trained at Harvard and Tufts (internal medicine and infectious diseases), then held positions at NIH, Johns Hopkins and Tufts. He has held academic appointments at University of Ioannina Medical School, Tufts University, Harvard School of Public Health and Imperial College.

Dr. Ioannidis has served as a member of the executive board of the Human Genome Epidemiology Network and Senior Advisor on Knowledge Integration at NCI/NIH (2012-6), President, Society for Research Synthesis Methodology, and editorial board member of many leading journals including Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has delivered over 400 invited and honorary lectures and is the recipient of many awards (e.g. European Award for Excellence in Clinical Science [2007], Medal for Distinguished Service, Teachers College, Columbia University [2015], Chanchlani Award for Global Health [2017]).

Dr. Ioannidis's empirical work includes meta-research and large-scale evidence (in particular randomized trials and meta-analyses) and appraisal and control of diverse biases in biomedical research. He is interested in developing and applying new research methods, and in the interdisciplinary enhancement of existing research methods for study design and analysis in biomedicine. Some of his most influential papers are those that address issues of replication validity of genetic association studies, biases in biomedical research, research synthesis methods, extensions of meta-analysis, genome-wide association studies and agnostic evaluation of associations, and validity of randomized trials and observational research. The PLoS Medicine paper on “Why most published research findings are false” has been the most-accessed article in the history of Public Library of Science (~2 million hits). In 2010,The Atlantic listed Dr. Ioannidis among its Brave Thinkers and wrote that he “may be one of the most influential scientists alive."

 

Dec 07, 2017
Addicted to Love: The Drive to Love, Who We Choose, and the Neural Foundations of Romantic Happiness and Love Addictions

Helen Fisher, PhD, a biological anthropologist, is Senior Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Visiting Research Professor and Member of the Center for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University, and Chief Scientific Advisor to Match.com. She uses brain scanning (fMRI) to study the neural systems associated with the sex drive, romantic love, attachment and long-term partner happiness. She has written six internationally best-selling books on romantic love and future sex, including: Why We Love (Holt, 2004); Why Him? Why Her? (Holt, 2010); and Anatomy of Love (2nd ed., W.W. Norton, 2016). Fisher is currently studying the biological basis of personality and is a pioneer in examining the neurochemistry of business team-building, innovation and leadership. Dr. Fisher has been on the national and international lecture circuit since l983 discussing the evolution of human sexuality, romantic love, marriage and divorce, gender differences, and the future of men and women in business and family life. She is a TED All-Star and a recipient of the American Anthropological Association’s Distinguished Service Award for her work at presenting anthropological data to the public.

 

Jan 11, 2018
Mind-Altering Devices: How Smartphones Shape Our Thoughts

Nicholas Carr writes about technology and culture. His new book, Utopia Is Creepy, collects his best essays, blog posts, and other writings from the past dozen years, providing an alternative history of our tech-besotted time. In 2014, Carr published the acclaimed book The Glass Cage: How Our Computers Are Changing Us, which examines the personal and social consequences of our ever growing dependency on computers, robots, and apps. His previous work, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize finalist and a New York Times bestseller. Carr is also the author of two other influential books, The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google (2008), and Does IT Matter? (2004). His books have been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

Carr has written for The Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Wired, Nature, MIT Technology Review, and many other periodicals. His essays, including “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” and “The Great Forgetting,” have been collected in several influential anthologies. In 2015, he received the Neil Postman Award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity from the Media Ecology Association.

Carr is a former member of the Encyclopedia Britannica’s editorial board of advisors, was on the steering board of the World Economic Forum’s cloud computing project, and was a writer-in-residence at the University of California, Berkeley’s journalism school. Since 2005, he has written the popular blog Rough Type. Earlier in his career, he was executive editor of the Harvard Business Review. He holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and an M.A., in English and American Literature and Language, from Harvard University.

 

Feb 22, 2018
Taming Complexity: From Network Science to Network Control

Albert-László Barabási is both the Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and a Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern University, where he directs the Center for Complex Network Research, and holds appointments in the Departments of Physics and Computer Science,as well as in the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women Hospital, and is a member of the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at Dana Farber Cancer Institute.  A Hungarian born native of Transylvania, Romania, he received his Masters in Theoretical Physics at the Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary and was awarded a Ph.D. three years later at Boston University. Barabási's latest book is Network Science (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He has also authored Linked: The New Science of Networks (Perseus, 2002), currently available in fifteen languages, Bursts: The Hidden Pattern behind Everything We Do (Dutton, 2010) available in five languages, and is the co-editor of The Structure and Dynamics of Networks (Princeton, 2005). His work lead to the discovery of scale-free networks in 1999, and proposed the Barabási-Albert model to explain their widespread emergence in natural, technological and social systems, from the cellular telephone to the WWW or online communities.

Barabási is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. In 2005 he was awarded the FEBS Anniversary Prize for Systems Biology and in 2006 the John von Neumann Medal by the John von Neumann Computer Society from Hungary, for outstanding achievements in computer-related science and technology. In 2004 he was elected into the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and in 2007 into the Academia Europaea.  He received the C&C Prize from the NEC C&C Foundation in 2008. In 2009  APS chose him Outstanding Referee and the US National Academies of Sciences awarded him the 2009 Cozzarelli Prize. In 2011 Barabási was awarded the Lagrange Prize-CRT Foundation for his contributions to complex systems and awarded the Doctor Honoris Causa from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. He is an elected Fellow in AAAS (Physics) and is a 2013 Fellow of the Massachusetts Academy of Sciences.

 

Jun 07, 2018
A Joint in Nature between Perception and Cognition without Modularity of Mind

Ned Block is the Silver Professor of Philosophy, Psychology and Neural Science at New York University. Dr. Block, who received his Ph.D. from Harvard University, came to NYU in 1996 from MIT where he was Chair of the Philosophy Program. He works in philosophy of perception and foundations of neuroscience and cognitive science and is currently writing a book on the perception/cognition border, A Joint in Nature between Cognition and Perception. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Cognitive Science Society, has been a Guggenheim Fellow, a Senior Fellow of the Center for the Study of Language and Information, a Sloan Foundation Fellow, a faculty member at two National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institutes and two Summer Seminars, the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Science Foundation; and a recipient of the Robert A. Muh Alumni Award in Humanities and Social Science from MIT and the Jean Nicod Prize, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. He is a past president of the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, a past Chair of the MIT Press Cognitive Science Board, and past President of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness. The Philosophers' Annual selected his papers as one of the "ten best" in 1983, 1990, 1995, 2002 and 2010. He is co-editor of The Nature of Consciousness: Philosophical Debates (MIT Press, 1997). The first of two volumes of his collected papers, Functionalism, Consciousness and Representation (MIT Press) came out in 2007.

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